Posts Tagged: history

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belaquadros:

Unveiling Frida Kahlo’s Closet

When the Mexican painter Frida Kahlo died in 1954, her husband muralist Diego Rivera locked her clothes and jewelry- all personal possessions- into a bathroom. Diego instructed that the room to be unlocked fifteen years after his own death. Forgotten, they stayed there for fifty years.

No one knew what was behind that locked door. Staring back from a life more notorious than most, were 300 items of Frida’s. Her jewelry, clothing, hair accessories, a  prosthetic leg, leather corsets, painted plaster casts and body molds. 

All the physical and emotional pain, joy and vitality is told through stories carried in Frida’s clothing and accessories. This treasure trove is organized into an exhibition titled Appearances Can Be Deceiving: The Dresses of Frida Kahlo,featuring eleven of Kahlo’s ensembles rotating every three months, showing forty outfits over the course of a year.

Conservators and curators said while excavating the hidden room, it was as if Frida was alongside them in the room. Her colorful clothing emitted a sense of happiness, while her hospital items, the casts and even medicine, were powerful to witness and held onto her sadness. 

Vogue Mexico is producing a room for the exhibition that will feature commissioned work from contemporary designers who have been influenced by Kahlo. A rep for the magazine declined to reveal the specific designers working on the project, but said that “they are international designers and one Mexican designer — all of them are very recognized in the fashion industry.”

The fashion curator Circe Henestrosa dug through the time capsule and organized the exhibition. Henestrosa says,"Garments are very powerful tools for social and cultural interpretation. These objects and garments tell you so much about the wearer and yes, the items do have a smell….how to describe the smell….it’s her. It’s a unique, beautiful smell, of her skin." 

Focusing on the issues of “disability” and “ethnicity,” the exhibition will be displayed in Frida Kahlo’s former home in Coyoacan, a suburb of Mexico City, the Frida Kahlo Museum (Casa Azul) through November 2013

(via ghostflo)

Source: belaquadros
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defunctfashion:

moika-palace:

Late 18th century day dress. (via Nordiska museet.)

that belt.

(via arseniccupcakes)

Source: moika-palace
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oldrags:

A woman in a daring riding habit, ca 1901 US

Source: oldrags
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omgthatdress:

Spencer Ensemble

1823

The Victoria & Albert Museum

Source: omgthatdress
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omgthatdress:

Petticoat

1855-1865

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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ornamentedbeing:

When I was planning my gown for the Regency Society of Tennessee’s  tea I found a photo from the Greene Collection at the Genesee Country Village & Museum.  I fell in love and had to make it happen!

The museum website describes the gown as a  ” … dress, from the same time period (1815-1820) is also entirely hand stitched icy green plain weave silk. It has a very high waist and very long tubular sleeves which would have been worn slightly ruched on the arm. The skirt is in 3 panels and slightly gathered in front and pleated in the back.

It has a Vandyked neckline of little triangular tabs in the sleeve, forming a gorgeous cap effect which is accented with little white ribbon bows.

The stitching on this dress as well as the fact that it is made of silk indicates that this would have been considered a “good” dress and would have been worn for special occasions.”

The gown was made from a beautiful mint cotton swiss that I purchased from The Lace Cottage  where I take my heirloom sewing lessons and the little bows on the puffs are made of silk.  The triangles that line the neckline are individually folded vandyke points and were the most challenging part of the costume.  I would also like to say thank you to Travellers Rest Plantation & Museum for graciously allowing me to take photos on their historic site. 

Source: ornamentedbeing
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oldrags:

More embroidery, trimming and edging patterns from the 1860’s.  Click for dates.

Source: oldrags
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ornamentedbeing:

Recently I asked a question on whether or not antiques should be worn which sparked a wonderful debate on the value we place on historic items.  The popular opinion was that antiques were meant to be cherished.  A month ago I was examining a heap of dirty fabric when I caught site of an embroidered scallop.  Recognizing the piece for what it was I bought the pile with the hopes that I might be able to rejuvenate it. 

From that dusty pile I was not only able to restore the fabric to it’s original condition but, I was able to give the piece a new life.  The gown is entirely hand stitched and I made sure that my best stitches went into attaching the antique net to the side panels of modern net. 

The ball gown was worn to the Regency Society of Tennessee’s 2nd annual ball.  The antique net is courtesy of a dodgy vendor at the local market and the swiss batiste was purchased from The Lace Cottage.  I’m very thankful to the Travellers Rest Plantation & Museum for allowing me to take photos on their stunning ground and to my brillaint Mother for styling my hair!

Source: ornamentedbeing